We’re having a heat wave…. but not a tropical heat wave.


School has ended. We unfortunately lost our older dog, Chessie, to a brain tumor. I won’t get into the specifics because it will make everyone cry, but I just wanted to explain my further delay in writing.

I’ve found as much as I wanted to do YouTube reviews, I cannot stand watching myself to edit them. I have no issues talking about games or answering questions, but I cannot spend hours editing myself. So for sanity purposes, I will rarely be posting videos.

As the daily temperatures are over 100, we cannot spend much time outside. So, [insert] indoor activities including gaming. A year ago, I did a blog on the benefits of video gaming in special needs communities. I said then I would do a review of older systems like the Nintendo Wii, the Sony PlayStation Move, and the Microsoft Kinect. I meant to do this in the height of the pandemic, but a heat wave seems like a good time, as well. (Due to the number of tables in this blog, I strongly suggest viewing this on a computer or in computer mode. I know all the lines are off in mobile version. It works okay on my husband’s android, and not well on iphone).

Why review old systems?

These systems were made with movements in mind using the TV screen. Unlike the newer switch, these were more durable… they were just built to last. Because they are older, if you go to a retro gaming store, you will often find these systems and games more affordable, which is a necessity for families with special needs kiddos.

I have owned all three.

Wii

Nintendo Wii

Pros:

  • Can be used for rehab/therapy
  • Low cost, everything is a set
  • Gamification of motor rehab
  • Bluetooth capabilities
  • Lots of cool accessories… sports and car shaped ones… all sold separately
  • Can download retro Nintendo games for it…

Cons:

  • Not suitable for all conditions, requires hand use.
  • Requires calibration for every player
  • Large amount of titles appropriate for children
  • Base set doesn’t work well for full body movement, can be fooled and play while laying down and use like a remote control
  • The Wii remote uses infrared lighting and detection on the bar… its similar to the same technology as modern tv remotes (think Roku, they often use IR) and sometimes you push the button several times because of interference. This means basic interface… up, down, left, right sensors.

My personal experience with this was I could never get the sensor quite right. I was constantly having to re-calibrate it. We were largely not able to enjoy the more physically oriented games on it, and ended up playing some MySims games on it, thinking we needed to get used to the controllers. After beating those at 100% (while laying down with our arms propped on pillows because pointing the controller at the TV was never at the correct angle…) we decided to sell the system. Unless you get it to play old Nintendo games, I cannot recommend it for physical activity, especially a special needs kid. I want to foster enjoyment and independence, not frustration.

When I had mine, they didn’t have recharging stations for the controllers, I used rechargeable batteries. You are expected to change the batteries… constantly. The battery life didn’t last long with them.

Some people swear by the Wii… others have tried the other 2 I’m about to talk about and don’t look back…

PlayStation Move

Sony PlayStation Move, PS3 version

Pros:

  • Rechargeable controllers, either plug into the system while it is on or use a charging station! 10 hour battery.
  • The PS Eye (camera) can locate the glowing orb in a 3D space, meaning not only can it tell where you are left and right, up and down, it can tell how close or far away you are.
  • High precision and accuracy
  • Rumble pack for player feedback
  • Unique accessories, all sold separately.
  • Compatibility: the Move controllers work on the PS3, the PS4, and the PS VR. (This means they’re not obsolete).

Cons:

  • Requires a PS3 or PS4
  • Sold separately from the PS console.
  • The PS Eye camera is not compatible across platforms, make sure you get the correct one for your console.
  • Joystick controller sold separately
  • Few games available outside of the use of “for the sake of gaming”

I thoroughly enjoy the Move. We have the joystick controller and the Wonderbook to go along with it. There are not enough Wonderbook titles, IMHO.

Here is a list of our favorite therapy friendly Move games:

Game:

Book of Spells

What is it?

Specs:

Physicality:

You are a student at Hogwarts and attend spell classes. Your controller is your wand and the Wonderbook is your spell book.

Solo play

10+, 7 in UK

This game is one of the most gentle games there is. It does use the wand controller, but it doesn’t require the joystick controller. The entire game is played while seated in augmented reality.

our thoughts:

Love, love, LOVE this game. I will admit, I wasn’t a good student. I apparently almost always caught the drapes on fire when using Incendio… thus losing house points. LOL. While progressing through the story line, the book reads lore from the Potterverse aloud with animation styles similar to the story of the Deathly Hallows. Not enough games like this. I have embedded a video at the end of this section regarding the making of this game.

Book of Potions

Once again at Hogwarts, this time in Potions class… with your Wonderbook acting as your potions guide.

Solo Play

10+, 7 in UK

This is still a sit down game requiring the lone orb controller.

our thoughts:

To be completely honest, this is a beast to find reasonably priced in the US, easy in the UK. We don’t have it, but want it terribly. As I’ve stated, there are not enough Wonderbook games, only 4, and of those 4, we are truly only interested in 2.

LOTR: Aragorn’s Quest

you follow a fun side story and play as Aragorn and Gandalf, the controller acting as a sword and staff.

2 player co-op

T for Teen for Fantasy Violence.

This does require both the orb controller and the joystick controller. Can be played seated the entire time. Easy enough my mother could play (with anoxic brain injury and mild strokes).

Most of the other Move games we have are for playing games. There is a variety of fantasy games where you use the controllers as wands or swords, most can be played while seated, which would work for wheel chair bound individuals. Most of these games are rated Teen and Mature, so outside the Wonderbook, a Move may not be the move you want to make until your kids are older, unless you also play.

Microsoft Kinect

Pros:

  • No controller needed! Just need the camera (If you don’t have voice set up, you may need the controller to get games started)
  • Has voice control you can use on many menus, including main menu of system.
  • Can be played in med and low lit rooms, will let you know if it needs more lighting.
  • Each gamer profile can be configured to fit the gamer’s physical needs. The Kinect will also auto recognize them.
  • No accessories needed.
  • Microsoft has designed games with the idea of therapy in mind, not only helping with coordination and mobility, but social skills and the ability to bond with their peers over video games.

Cons:

  • Camera sold separately, not compatible with multiple platforms. Sold separately for Xbox 360, Xbox One, and Windows.
  • Does not do well with tons of light, so cannot be played outside.
  • The more players you add, the more difficulty the Kinect has with tracking. Optimum is 1-2 players. 4 can be chaos, but is still fun.
  • Many games require the use of legs
  • More Kinect games are available for the 360 than the other platforms.

The Kinect is hands down our favorite. We originally got it for Thing 2 as a gift for physical therapy, which she was attending weekly. We lived in the south east on an island and she has a severe mosquito allergy. She had to stay indoors most of the time. The Kinect was a life saver.

We have a LOT of Kinect games, a majority of them being dance games because there’s no controllers! I will list some of the more unique ones outside of dance games, because I feel that genre is self explanatory. (Most of the dance games can host up to 4 players).

Game:

What is it?

Specs:

Physicality:

Disney Fantasia

Fantasia: Music Evolved follows more conductor type movements. During musical pieces, from classical to modern music, players can modify it with different styles and featuring different instruments. The combinations are near endless, allowing for enjoyable repeat gameplay for music lovers.

The campaign mode is solo. There is a co-play mode, but the story is so much better played solo.

Rated 10+ due to some lyrics.

While it is designed to be played standing like a conductor, you can do this sitting, however, you may need some adjustments to allow for all the arm movements.

our thoughts:

This is Thing 3’s favorite Kinect game. The music is pretty enjoyable. I would have loved to have had more classical music. This game is largely underrated and we wish there was a sequel.

Disneyland Adventures

This game is the virtual theme park. The rides are mini-games. There are tons of things to do if you or the child isn’t particularly active that day, like search for hidden Mickey’s, collect autographs and photos, hug your favorite characters.

This CAN be played with 2 players, but works best with 1.

I don’t know why it says E10+, it’s 7+ in other countries. Thing 2 played it at age 4.

When “walking” around the park, only arms are needed, we have played it sitting down, but the mini games are often full body.

our thoughts:

Not only does this game encourage physical movement within your favorite Disney movies, it encourages social skills as your character interacts with the park characters. An example is you can ask for a hug either verbally or with specific non-verbal gestures. It reinforces waving hello and goodbye, shaking hands, etc. This was used as part of therapy for Thing 2. Other than the mini games, the background noises of the “park” while walking around are not overwhelming.

I will admit I played it in the middle of the night, I wanted all the autographs. ~sheepish grin~

Rush: Disney Pixar Adventure

This is somewhat like the Disneyland one, but with Pixar characters and less focus on a theme park, more on the minigames.

Up to 2 players.

E for Everyone.

Full body

our thoughts:

While cute, we definitely enjoyed Disneyland Adventures over this one. It was missing the magical feeling in the park. I know it sounds silly, since its a virtual park, but I’m just being honest.

Fable: Journey

This game follows the Fable trilogy as a mage, but less choices, more path led… so no more “Chicken Chaser.”

Solo play only.

Rated Teen (12+ in other areas): mild blood, mild language, violence

This game is made to be played while sitting. I will admit it is quite physical in the arms and upper body. I used this as part of my rehab and it was very affective, made me very sore.

our thoughts:

While this game is not designed for kids, not only small kids have disabilities. This is story enriched and is beautiful to look at. There wasn’t anything majorly offensive I needed to worry about for my kids (unlike the original trilogy).

Kinectimals

Run a big cat and bear sanctuary and feed/train the animals.

It’s a better version of Nintendogs, Catz/Dogz…

Solo play

Rated E for Everyone.

Most care can be done while sitting. Some of the training requires full body movements and speech.

our thoughts:

This is a cute game, also probably one of the quietest games we have. The background sounds are peaceful without tons of music. Both Thing 2 and Thing 4 had issues with sensory overload when they were younger. This game was Thing 4’s favorite.

Star Wars

4 ways to play:

Jedi Destiny: Main story mode, become a padawan, use a lightsaber and the force to find your destiny.

Podracing: it’s racing podracers.

Rancor Rampage: mind control a Rancor and have them crush, crumble, and chomp.

Galactic Dance-Off: It’s a dancing game with parodies of modern music with Star Wars themed lyrics…

Co-op 2 players

Up to 4 for the dancing.

Rated T for Teen: Mild Lyrics, Blood, Violence

(If your kid is a huge Star Wars fan, this game is the least of your worries).

Depends on which mode you play. Podracing and Rancors require arm movements, while Jedi Destiny will require more movements overall. Dance obviously requires full body movements.

our thoughts:

I’ll admit, this game has some issues. If you are not a die hard Star Wars fan, pass and pass hard. The jedi controls are weird and cause some funny antics. We spend more time laughing at each other than we do actually progressing in the game.

I can think of better racing games than podracing… I like Rancors. ~shrug~

The dancing is debatable on whether it’s meant to be B-rated movie bad or Star Wars Holiday Special bad. I like B-rated movies. I haven’t been able to make it thought the Holiday Special in one setting yet. I was originally semi excited thinking of the cantina and Star Wars Galaxies… thought I’d get to be a Twi’lek dancer. Was in shock to see a bunch of storm troopers and bounty hunters dancing.

Boba Fett intro, Star Wars Holiday Special 1978

The Kinect is more versatile with a large game library, especially on the 360. I would suggest this route when looking into a physical video game.

Synopsis:

Wii

Sony PlayStation Move

Microsoft Kinect

  • Makes a better gaming system than a therapy adjunct.
  • The Wonderbook is amazing, but not enough titles for it.
  • Controllers are rechargable
  • Few child titles.
  • Excellent games that can be played from a seated or wheelchair position, but requires finger use for button.
  • No controllers
  • Lots of titles for kids of varying ages
  • Most games cannot be played seated
  • Almost half the game titles are exercise or dance games…
  • There are some really cool adult titles as well… we need exercise, too (Elder Scrolls V, to name one).

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